Shopping for a pre-built computer isn’t something you’d like to do on a Sunday afternoon — between the price, what you want in a PC, and all the extra things that don’t come with it, it’s probably more of a hassle than what it’s worth. Unfortunately, computers are a big part of our life, and we need them. Luckily, you can always build your own PC! Is the very idea of it scaring you? Well, it shouldn’t, because as long as you can follow instructions and know how to use a screwdriver or other small tools, then you’re pretty much qualified to build one. Still not convinced? Well, here are six reasons why you should build your own PC:

  1. It’s cheaper.

Buying the parts you need separately and assembling them yourself is only going to cost you a fraction of what it would cost you to buy a pre-built computer. With computers you buy in a store, you get the basic, what everyone needs kind of package deal. When you build your own PC, you can customize it with whatever programs you might want.

  1. It’s a special skill development.

Not everyone can say, “Hey, you like that PC? I build it.” A skill like this would lend a hand in other things that involve building or electronics, and it even opens a new door for a type of employment — a PC fixer-upper.

  1. You are your own tech person.

Now you won’t have to wait to hear back from someone who claims to know what the problem is without looking at the computer; you can fix it yourself. Not only that, but you can replace the exact part that needs it, rather than ship your entire computer off to someone else and go without your PC for a week or two.

  1. You’ll get longer warranties.

Store-bought computers typically come with a one-year warranty policy, and then after that, that’s it. When you build your own, however, the parts come with longer warranties — usually two or more years. It saves your money in the long run when replacing parts.

  1. Building your own PC will help hone those problem-solving skills.

You are more than likely going to encounter a problem or obstacle or two during the building process, and will have to learn how to get around them in your own creative way. It also offers you a chance to really dig down into research and learn all you can about the subject.

  1. It’s fun!

It’s a new things for you to do — and to conquer; it will take time and patience, but it’s not impossible to do. Who knows? It could be your next favorite hobby.

There are many, many other benefits to building your own computer. Can you think of a few? Let us know!

Now more than ever, coding is popping up in schools; from elementary to high school, students are being introduced to the world of coding and what all it takes. If you’ve ever told yourself, “I’d love to learn coding, but I’m no good at math,” then you’re in luck, because coding can actually help improve your math skills!

Coding can help kids visualize abstract concepts. If you or your child has an issue with math, or following along with the algorithms and problems, that’s okay, because coding doesn’t throw numbers and variables at you, it gives you a set of sequences that can lead up to the answer; sort of like a puzzle or a quest in a video game. A lot of programs that teach coding will give the student visuals to go along with whatever sequence they’re learning; coding is equal parts visual, repetitive, and hands-on learning.

Coding helps students apply mathematical functions to real-world problems. No more cartfulls of watermelons, or trains arriving at stations; they can use the math skills they learn in the classroom to create things like phone apps or games.

Coding is a sequence. As said above, to get to one place while coding, you need to complete the set task first. It is a motivational reward for students to get where they need to go, and a lot like a game. Most of the time, kids don’t even realize they’re using math to do certain tasks.

Coding makes math in general fun! Just like any game used to teach mathematics, this takes the stress off of learning number sequences or other techniques.

So if you’re worried about “not being good at math,” but love the idea of creating something like an app or a game, or just the idea of coding, then give it a try; the only thing stopping you is you!

Studying can be hard. No, scratch that; studying can be downright impossible, especially if you’re trying to balance your life with other essential things like work, social gatherings, sleeping, eating, breathing — just to name a few. School gets in the way of a lot of things, but that doesn’t make it a bad time. Studying is supposed to be a wonderful tool to keep grades and spirits high, but oftentimes it’s seen as grueling, a nuisance, and just plain unenjoyable. The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that way! Here are four fun ways to study:

#1. Rewards!

One of the biggest tricks while studying is to keep a reward system in place; once you reach a specific goal that you’ve set.for yourself, the reward is all yours! You can use a piece of candy for every x-amount of pages read, playtime with your pet, a moment to work on your art — the options are limitless! The only thing you need to be wary of is the amount of time you spend on these rewards; allocate yourself no more than ten minutes to avoid never going back to your studying ever again.

#2. Association!

If you’re having a hard time remembering things, try to associate whatever you’re learning about. For example: say you’re trying to remember what exactly photosynthesis is, and you automatically associate it with that one Spongebob episode. That’s okay! Your brain will connect the two and you’ll know exactly what you need to when you read the word. Or maybe you need to remember when the Vietnam War ended (1975), you can think of the song “A Change of Heart” by The 1975.

#3. Be colorful!

Change things up and use colored pencils, markers, stickers, fancy colored paper — whatever draws your attention to the important parts. Your brain is hardwired to recall changes in color like that, and you’ll mentally file it away for later use. Why do you think highlighters are so vibrant?

#4. Learn everything!

Utilize every single resource you have for a certain topic. Read the notes and the textbook, Google articles or blog posts, watch videos, look in forums; get as much knowledge as you can and it’ll be the easiest study session you’ve ever had!

There are so many different ways to study, and these might seem fun to you, or they might not; everyone is different. What would you add?

Computers are a big part of everyday life, and they can’t really be avoided — especially in school or the workplace. This post is being written on a computer, and you might be reading it on a monitor or laptop as well. With these machines being so impactful in our day to day functions, we need to make sure that the technology doesn’t run away from us; so here are six basic keyboard shortcuts for nearly any computer:

1.) Ctrl + Alt + a.

Press these keys on your keyboard all relatively at the same time, and this will highlight all of the text in the window that’s open, whether it be in a word processor or a web page. If you are using an Apple product, such as an iMac or MacBook, then the shortcut is simply “command + a”.

2.) Ctrl + Alt + c.

This will copy the text that you previously selected. It’s usually more convenient for quick quote transfers, or when using a track pad on a laptop, since they are touchy. On the macOS (Apple laptop or desktop hardware), “command + c” will get you the same result. These shortcuts copy the text, rather than take the original from its source.

3.) Ctrl + alt + v.

This is the “paste” option, which allows you to place a duplicate of the text you have either copied or cut from another window. The original formatting is usually the same, meaning it will most likely look exactly like the other, but sometimes programs don’t support that. “command + v” for Mac.

4.) Ctrl + shift + n.

This shortcut works on both Windows and Mac (“command” instead of “ctrl”) users, and will take you to something called an “incognito” window. The purpose of the incognito window is essentially privacy; it won’t save search history, won’t save cookies (which are pieces of information stored in your web browser from certain websites, which, in turn, help generate ads and suggested websites based on your past visits), and it won’t remember information entered on private forms, such as applications of profile information.

5.) Ctrl/Cmd + plus/minus keys.

This will make for a more comfortable reading or inspection of a photo on any website! You have the ability to go up to 500% magnification, which is just like looking at the logo of a website, but blown up by a lot. If you want to go back to the default setting (100%), then just hit ctrl/cmd + 0, and it’ll take you right there.

6.) Ctrl + alt + t.

This open a new tab in your web browser; command + t on macOS. If you want to alternate between one or more tabs in a window without using a mouse or track pad, then Ctrl/Cmd + number (1-9) will take you to the first, second, third, and so on tabs. The number nine will always take you to the last tab, though, no matter how many you may have open.