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You’ve probably heard about how important coding will be in the future, how industries are implementing more technology into their operations to save money and create better products or services. Parents know the importance of learning coding, with 58% of them feeling that coding and programming is the most beneficial skill to their child’s future. When it comes to careers, few can argue that learning coding puts you in position for a great one.

But what if you just want to code for fun?

Hobbies Are Fun

Having a hobby gives us a sense of excitement and happiness when we’re pursuing them. Your grandpa had fishing, your dad had woodworking, and now you have coding. Once you get a hold of the basics you can, you can apply what you can continue to dig deeper into coding or you can just start applying it to another hobby.

That’s right, you can take your knowledge of coding and programming and apply it to activities you really love. For instance, let’s say you love writing and you have a blog that you update weekly. With coding, you can now make your blog pop even more now that you know how to manipulate the code.

You Learn Hobbies at Your Own Pace

Hobbies like playing the guitar or learning to skateboard take time to master the skills necessary. Hobbies differ from school work in that no one forces you to learn a hobby; there’s no mandatory homework or tests at the end of the year. Unless you’re taking coding classes in school, coding can be tackled on your own time. Let’s say you dive into the basics, and after a couple of weeks decide that you’re bored.

Take a break. We guarantee you that some time after you’ll want to revisit the hobby.

Many places like theCoderSchool understand that too much information at once takes the fun out of coding, so curriculum is often tailored to children based on age, skill level, and general coding goals.

It Could Come in Handy

With technology having more of an influence on our lives every day, it’s hard to imagine an industry that won’t use coding in some way or fashion. Your coding hobby could play an important role in your future and you might not even know it. Your dream could be to be a graphic designer, and when an employer has a pile of resumes to pick from, your coding hobby might make you stand out from the crowd.

While we do predict that you’ll fall in love with coding, we know that everyone has different dreams and goals. Coding may not be the most important thing in your life but having a general knowledge of it could make your dreams come true. It’s all about being well-rounded, people who are get the most attention from colleges and employers.

So can coding be a hobby?

Yes, not only can it be, but it should! After all, you want to do something you love, whether that be for work or in your free time is up to you.

Coding is more than an incredible hobby – it’s a skill that you can feel proud to learn. When mastered, coding can lead to career development opportunities in an array of fields. However, in addition to improving future job qualifications, coding also improves your personal development by helping you acquire necessary soft skills. Read on to learn 4 soft skills that are honed by coding.

 

Teamwork

You start developing many skills the moment you begin learning to code in a classroom environment. Working with instructors, asking questions, and taking feedback with a good attitude all require teamwork. Once you go into the workplace, you will no doubt be assigned projects that call for collaboration between other coders, outside departments, and even hired contractors.

One aspect of learning to code that’s attractive for many people is the potential to work from home, but even then, you will have to maintain contact with co-workers to ensure you’re all on the same page.

 

Creativity

The perception of programmers portrayed by the media is often a distorted one, usually a math wiz in a basement placed in front several monitors typing away robotically. Don’t get us wrong, there’s lots of math involved and double monitors rule but the creativity it takes to code really does go unnoticed. The reason your creativity expands when you learn to code is because you begin to possess the tools to build almost anything you want, whether you learn to build video games, virtual reality programs, robots or websites, the possibilities are endless.

 

Critical Thinking

Coding can involve an onslaught of information at once, especially if you’re just beginning your education. Over time, your ability to not only understand the information on the screen, but also develop solutions based off that data will improve. There are tons of resources out there for solving coding problems, but in the professional world, problems may arise that have no existing solutions. Analyzing lines of code to locate the exact location of an error, or piece that can be modified for a specific action takes critical thinking skills that can be honed over time.

You will get to a point where you can solve problems quickly, but this will take time and something else…

 

Patience

Learning to code is like learning to play an instrument, except where you’d drive yourself crazy trying to extend your pinky to the 7th fret, you’ll instead be tempted to smash your keyboard while attempting to change a color or font size on the screen. Coding can be frustrating at first and takes practice to understand fully – and with technology and programming languages constantly evolving, you’ll truly never fully perfect it. But, you can have the patience to learn new things, no matter how challenging they are.

The road to coding mastery is one filled with ups and downs, but the rewards that come with it will soon show on your screen and within yourself.