Learning a new language can be difficult, no matter the origin. That’s not to say that it’s impossible! We have put together some tips for learning almost any coding language:

First off, there are over 100 languages that coders and programmers use (actually, we’ve heard that there’s even more than 2,000, and that’s just because languages are developing every single day!), so don’t feel overwhelmed. You can just simply pick from a list of 10, or whatever serves your coding goals best! Some of the most popular are JavaScript, Python, Java, Go, Elixir, Ruby, Kotlin, TypeScript, Scala, and Clojure.

You know what one you want to learn? Great! (If not, don’t stress, these tips apply to ALL languages.)

1. Actively practice.

You can’t just read something and then let it be. You have to continuously keep practicing and using the language in order to become fluent in it. A fun way to practice is by solving coding challenges. There are websites such as LeetCode that can help you increase your fluency, and will teach you more about the structure and syntax of the language.

2. Write things down.

While typing on a keyboard is the way you’ll be using the coding language in the future, writing it down helps burn it into your memory and store it somewhere where you can easily access it. We’re no brain experts, but have you ever noticed that you remember something better after writing it down? That’s why. Give it a shot!

3. Don’t over-do it.

It’s exciting, yes, but we’re not machines. Our brains need a break — even though it’s for fun, and you WANT to do it. You still need a break, to give your mind time to store what you’ve learned, give your eyes a rest, and get the blood moving through your body again. Don’t be a coding zombie.

4. Read a lot.

While you might not understand the language as a whole yet, reading the language in question — and reading a LOT — can’t hurt, because you’ll find yourself picking up on things as you go. Eventually you’ll train yourself to read almost effortlessly.

5. Build something!

Use the language that you’ve learned, and use it often! Even if it’s in something small, you’re still applying the knowledge that you’ve gained, and making it part of your life. This ultimately helps build fluency and recognition.

6. Use a linter.

Linters are code-analyzing tools that flag any errors or bugs you may have created in your newly-learned coding language, so that way you can go back and fix the problem. Think of it as a SpellCheck for coding.

It might be hard to do at first, but don’t give up! Once you beat that learning curve, you’ll find that learning these new languages is fun and effective! Go on! Try it!