There are thousands of ways to study; some do it in chunks with timed and manageable breaks, others cram it all into one hour, and some have zany, yet effective, ways to get the brain juices going. Everyone’s style is different. Whatever way you study, there is oftentimes music involved, right?  That’s because music actually helps you retain more information! It has to do with triggering certain centers of the brain that help you absorb all that scholarly goodness. There are some music types that hinder studying, too, so it’s important to remember the kinds of music that are good for this specific task: lyricless. (This is something that applies to a lot of people, but not to all!) The types of lyricless — or instrumental — music are just about as vast as other genres with lyrics in them, so finding the right one might be hard, but many streaming music apps and websites have pre-made lists for you to browse! Don’t worry; we know it’s overwhelming, so we’re here to offer up our top twenty list of songs that are perfect for study time.

Before we get into that, you should know that you have the ability to choose between instrumental, ambient, and nature noises! Instrumental is pretty self explanatory: you have a song typically played by one instrument — a piano or an acoustic guitar — with gentle rhythms and melodies. (Our list also includes a violin sonata or two.) Ambient music is done almost completely electronically with no real pattern, and is used specifically to enhance emotions. Nature noises are, well, nature noises. That being said, here we go:

#1. Welcome Home by Sigriour

#2. The Watchtower by Sigimund

#3. Iles de la Madeleine by Tommy Berre

#4. Gotham (acoustic) by Claes Nilsson

#5. The Ludlows by Cristopher Varela

#6. Literally anything by Bach.

#7. Serenade: IV by Leanard Bernstein

#8. Road Movies I by John Adams

#9. Scottish Fantasy, OP:46.1 by Max Bruch

#10. Oblivion by Gidon Kremer

#11. Trancemission Four by Delta Rain Dance

#12. See by TENGGER

#13. Walking in a spiral towards th house: Side C by Nivhek

#14. Everything All at Once by G Jones

#15. Badlands Train by Stubbleman

#16. Rhapsody in Green by Mort Garson

#17. Nevergreen by Emancipator

#18. Nest by Justin Nozuka

#19. Second Sun by Bonobo

#20. A Spark, A Beginning by Corre

Note: When it come to nature noises (you’ll notice we don’t have any listed here) that just about anything will do; a thunderstorm, a light rain shower, wind in the grass, crickets, the ocean, a stream… You see where we’re going with this? If you like to study to the music of Mother Earth, then you will just have to pick a sound and go from there! There are no “top favorites” in nature!

Let us know in the comments what songs get you in the studying mood!

Not everyone is perfect, including our friendly neighborhood video game developers, who sometimes don’t catch the programming errors in a game during test plays before it’s released to the public. Programming is hard, and these glitches can result in some seriously funny and downright inexplicable occurrences. Here are our favorite glitches from video games that were all due to programming errors:

1. Madden NFL 15’s “Tiny Man”

This glitch resulted in a Browns linebacker being turned into a Thumbelina version of himself, but with all the speed, strength, and agility of his original size. The game creators rolled with the glitch, though, and even kept the mini player model after fixing the problem.

2. Big Rigs

The game itself is notorious for glitches; one of which is when a big 18-wheeler zaps itself through a bridge, hugs a mountain, and then speeds up to an unmentionable speed before crashing the game entirely.

3. The Sims games

Earlier versions of the game were known to glitch out, from smoking body parts to vanishing furniture. One of the most recent glitches that sparked an array of giggles is the “monster baby,” in which a baby character is only a flesh-colored Picasso collage.

4. Pokémon Red / Blue / Yellow’s “MissingNo. Trick”

This “Pokémon” was used in a training video, to help teach you how to catch a Pokémon. After talking to the Old Man, who will so wonderfully teach you the catching ways, you’ll run into a wild “Missingno,” which is a nameless Pokemon glitch that can either duplicate items or delete your entire saved game — it was a 50-50 chance.

5. Super Smash Brothers Melee’s Master Hand

It took eight years of thinking that it was impossible to play as the infamous Master Hand, but then the glitch was found!

6. Pokémon Red / Blue / Yellow’s Mew Finding

That’s right, you can catch an actual Mew with this glitch, with no extra mods or special work on your part.

7. Tiger Woods PGA Tour ’08

There is a specific glitch in this game in which Woods walks on water to get a better shot. It got so much attention, that EA Games had to address it publicly.

There are many glitches in the video game world, because it’s very complex to make them and oversee every single aspect of it once it’s been released. Sometimes, but glitches are frustrating, but most times, they’re just fun. What other glitches have you experienced? Let us know in the comments!

Shopping for a pre-built computer isn’t something you’d like to do on a Sunday afternoon — between the price, what you want in a PC, and all the extra things that don’t come with it, it’s probably more of a hassle than what it’s worth. Unfortunately, computers are a big part of our life, and we need them. Luckily, you can always build your own PC! Is the very idea of it scaring you? Well, it shouldn’t, because as long as you can follow instructions and know how to use a screwdriver or other small tools, then you’re pretty much qualified to build one. Still not convinced? Well, here are six reasons why you should build your own PC:

  1. It’s cheaper.

Buying the parts you need separately and assembling them yourself is only going to cost you a fraction of what it would cost you to buy a pre-built computer. With computers you buy in a store, you get the basic, what everyone needs kind of package deal. When you build your own PC, you can customize it with whatever programs you might want.

  1. It’s a special skill development.

Not everyone can say, “Hey, you like that PC? I build it.” A skill like this would lend a hand in other things that involve building or electronics, and it even opens a new door for a type of employment — a PC fixer-upper.

  1. You are your own tech person.

Now you won’t have to wait to hear back from someone who claims to know what the problem is without looking at the computer; you can fix it yourself. Not only that, but you can replace the exact part that needs it, rather than ship your entire computer off to someone else and go without your PC for a week or two.

  1. You’ll get longer warranties.

Store-bought computers typically come with a one-year warranty policy, and then after that, that’s it. When you build your own, however, the parts come with longer warranties — usually two or more years. It saves your money in the long run when replacing parts.

  1. Building your own PC will help hone those problem-solving skills.

You are more than likely going to encounter a problem or obstacle or two during the building process, and will have to learn how to get around them in your own creative way. It also offers you a chance to really dig down into research and learn all you can about the subject.

  1. It’s fun!

It’s a new things for you to do — and to conquer; it will take time and patience, but it’s not impossible to do. Who knows? It could be your next favorite hobby.

There are many, many other benefits to building your own computer. Can you think of a few? Let us know!

Now more than ever, coding is popping up in schools; from elementary to high school, students are being introduced to the world of coding and what all it takes. If you’ve ever told yourself, “I’d love to learn coding, but I’m no good at math,” then you’re in luck, because coding can actually help improve your math skills!

Coding can help kids visualize abstract concepts. If you or your child has an issue with math, or following along with the algorithms and problems, that’s okay, because coding doesn’t throw numbers and variables at you, it gives you a set of sequences that can lead up to the answer; sort of like a puzzle or a quest in a video game. A lot of programs that teach coding will give the student visuals to go along with whatever sequence they’re learning; coding is equal parts visual, repetitive, and hands-on learning.

Coding helps students apply mathematical functions to real-world problems. No more cartfulls of watermelons, or trains arriving at stations; they can use the math skills they learn in the classroom to create things like phone apps or games.

Coding is a sequence. As said above, to get to one place while coding, you need to complete the set task first. It is a motivational reward for students to get where they need to go, and a lot like a game. Most of the time, kids don’t even realize they’re using math to do certain tasks.

Coding makes math in general fun! Just like any game used to teach mathematics, this takes the stress off of learning number sequences or other techniques.

So if you’re worried about “not being good at math,” but love the idea of creating something like an app or a game, or just the idea of coding, then give it a try; the only thing stopping you is you!

Studying can be hard. No, scratch that; studying can be downright impossible, especially if you’re trying to balance your life with other essential things like work, social gatherings, sleeping, eating, breathing — just to name a few. School gets in the way of a lot of things, but that doesn’t make it a bad time. Studying is supposed to be a wonderful tool to keep grades and spirits high, but oftentimes it’s seen as grueling, a nuisance, and just plain unenjoyable. The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that way! Here are four fun ways to study:

#1. Rewards!

One of the biggest tricks while studying is to keep a reward system in place; once you reach a specific goal that you’ve set.for yourself, the reward is all yours! You can use a piece of candy for every x-amount of pages read, playtime with your pet, a moment to work on your art — the options are limitless! The only thing you need to be wary of is the amount of time you spend on these rewards; allocate yourself no more than ten minutes to avoid never going back to your studying ever again.

#2. Association!

If you’re having a hard time remembering things, try to associate whatever you’re learning about. For example: say you’re trying to remember what exactly photosynthesis is, and you automatically associate it with that one Spongebob episode. That’s okay! Your brain will connect the two and you’ll know exactly what you need to when you read the word. Or maybe you need to remember when the Vietnam War ended (1975), you can think of the song “A Change of Heart” by The 1975.

#3. Be colorful!

Change things up and use colored pencils, markers, stickers, fancy colored paper — whatever draws your attention to the important parts. Your brain is hardwired to recall changes in color like that, and you’ll mentally file it away for later use. Why do you think highlighters are so vibrant?

#4. Learn everything!

Utilize every single resource you have for a certain topic. Read the notes and the textbook, Google articles or blog posts, watch videos, look in forums; get as much knowledge as you can and it’ll be the easiest study session you’ve ever had!

There are so many different ways to study, and these might seem fun to you, or they might not; everyone is different. What would you add?

Computers are a big part of everyday life, and they can’t really be avoided — especially in school or the workplace. This post is being written on a computer, and you might be reading it on a monitor or laptop as well. With these machines being so impactful in our day to day functions, we need to make sure that the technology doesn’t run away from us; so here are six basic keyboard shortcuts for nearly any computer:

1.) Ctrl + Alt + a.

Press these keys on your keyboard all relatively at the same time, and this will highlight all of the text in the window that’s open, whether it be in a word processor or a web page. If you are using an Apple product, such as an iMac or MacBook, then the shortcut is simply “command + a”.

2.) Ctrl + Alt + c.

This will copy the text that you previously selected. It’s usually more convenient for quick quote transfers, or when using a track pad on a laptop, since they are touchy. On the macOS (Apple laptop or desktop hardware), “command + c” will get you the same result. These shortcuts copy the text, rather than take the original from its source.

3.) Ctrl + alt + v.

This is the “paste” option, which allows you to place a duplicate of the text you have either copied or cut from another window. The original formatting is usually the same, meaning it will most likely look exactly like the other, but sometimes programs don’t support that. “command + v” for Mac.

4.) Ctrl + shift + n.

This shortcut works on both Windows and Mac (“command” instead of “ctrl”) users, and will take you to something called an “incognito” window. The purpose of the incognito window is essentially privacy; it won’t save search history, won’t save cookies (which are pieces of information stored in your web browser from certain websites, which, in turn, help generate ads and suggested websites based on your past visits), and it won’t remember information entered on private forms, such as applications of profile information.

5.) Ctrl/Cmd + plus/minus keys.

This will make for a more comfortable reading or inspection of a photo on any website! You have the ability to go up to 500% magnification, which is just like looking at the logo of a website, but blown up by a lot. If you want to go back to the default setting (100%), then just hit ctrl/cmd + 0, and it’ll take you right there.

6.) Ctrl + alt + t.

This open a new tab in your web browser; command + t on macOS. If you want to alternate between one or more tabs in a window without using a mouse or track pad, then Ctrl/Cmd + number (1-9) will take you to the first, second, third, and so on tabs. The number nine will always take you to the last tab, though, no matter how many you may have open.

Coding is everything in the 21st century. From the Instagram app on your phone to the intricacies of your work laptop, it all uses a string of code. Numbers and letters all piled into a specific order can run an entire interface of computers. It is a wild thought. But knowing coding can prove to be a career unlike any other. There are jobs popping up at every new company for coders. There is a need for them in nearly every field from medicine to gaming. If you have the skills to be a coder, these careers are surely right up your alley.

Software/Web Developer

This is probably the field with the vastest array of jobs for coders. You can make anywhere from $50,000 a year to north of $100,000 to create software for companies.

Engineering

Knowing coding is not the easiest thing. So engineering new computers can be for you. With a little extra training, your skills could go a long way.

Database Administrators

Database administrator tend to a large set of information on many different levels. If you can analyze an issue and be a fast problem solver while still using your coding ability, this job is for you.

Computer Analyst

Analysts of computer systems usually merge the gap between the business side of a company and the IT side of the company so that people can understand it. Breaking down the coding from IT and transforming into something a business man understands.

Software Quality Engineer

This is an important job at technology based companies. Someone has to assure that everything is running smoothly. Continuing the effort of the software developer you tend to that software and make it the best it can be.

Business Intelligence

This can be military based or company based. The business intelligence analyst would dissect all the inner workings of the company’s technology and grab information that can help the technology move forward.

Computer Programming

This is the most obvious for a skilled coder. Someone has to do the dirty work and create the programs behind the technology. If you are creative and intelligent, this field may be for you.

Networking Administrator

Coding is loosely needed in this field, but will always help. Networking is huge in today’s online world. Knowing the way around the web and its inner workings can give you the upper hand.

No matter what field you choose, coding is a huge need in our world. Use it to your advantage, and lock up a career that pays well, and keeps you doing what you enjoy.

Computers, coding, and how the internet works can seem like confusing concepts for many people. There is much to learn about the roles each person has in creating code — but what a front rnd developer does is a good place to start. We sometimes think of the internet as this overwhelmingly complicated place, but it can be simplified. With a basis of knowledge, it is possible to understand what is going on behind the scenes every time you go online.

Now, in the simplest terms, a front end developer deals with the beginning of a person’s experience on a browser. For example, say you open up Google Chrome on your laptop, everything visually that you can see is made by a front end developer. The Google logo, the tabs for image search, the coding that delivers you through the internet to a different website, etc.; this is all the handy work of the front end. They are responsible for the look and feel of every site you click on. The main task of a front end developer is to create interaction and a user experience that will keep them intrigued. Most browsers or individual sites are not boring. This is on purpose. It catches the users’ senses. Don’t get confused though, a web designer is the person that orchestrates how a website looks to our eye. However, without the front end coding, there would be no website. From the top; a front end developer creates coding that enables the website designer to create a beautiful, but usable site.

Some companies are now beginning to use “responsive” front end developers. So, the original use for the developer was fixed, meaning that the site would get developed and that was all the user would ever see. But in today’s world, people want more. Companies began tailoring browsers to the users. By adding extra coding, the user can adapt their own way of using it, making it easier for them to understand. The developer wants to create a website where there is a mix of functionality and speed. It should be easy to use for anyone but also fast so that the user experience is as pleasurable as possible.

The job of a front end developer is not an easy one. Since they are coding, the developer has to be extremely tech savvy. But they can’t only be good technically, as the developer has to be creative as well. They are helping the web designer create a website that keeps users coming back time and time again.

Staying motivated can be hard, especially for someone living a multitask life between school, sports, work, volunteering, or any other resume-builder. The truth is, life sort of requires you to live chaotically if you want to achieve your goals and dreams. It’s understandable that there are days when all you really want to do is lay in bed with a family size bag of chips and binge watch something that isn’t even good; everyone’s been there. The problem starts when you can’t pull yourself out of that comfortable spot and get everything you need done. When projects fall behind, so does your mental and physical health.

So, how does one stay motivated?

Write yourself inspirational messages on colorful sticky notes, and place them around the areas that you visit every day — your refrigerator in your kitchen, your bathroom mirror, on the wall above your bed, on doors, etc. The colors will draw your attention, and the notes themselves will give you the right boost for the right moments.

Meditation is also a good way to gather your thoughts after a lazy day, or even when you’re just not feeling up to doing what needs done that day.

It might sound cheesy, but meditation will help you organize your mind and realize what emotions might be tying you to your bed. The mind is a wondrous thing, and taking a second to just get lost in it, alone in a quiet room, is one of the healthiest things you can do when you’re not motivated to work or read or write.

Create a playlist that amps you up!

Are there songs that really speak to you, or get your blood flowing? Then those should be in that playlist. Don’t pick songs that are too emotional or slow — you need your brain to tell you to get up and go. Music has a crazy way of effecting people, so give it a try! You might be surprised.

Be open about how you’re feeling with one or two people.

Lack of motivation is often times associated with other feelings, like not wanting to write a paper because, deep down, you have no confidence in your chosen topic, or not wanting to clean your room because you know you’re going to find things in there that will make you nostalgic — stuff like that. Getting deep into the root of the no motivation crisis will help change a lot of attitudes towards certain tasks; it’s usually not just “being lazy”, but rather feeling some type of way about something related to the task that keeps you from being your best, motivated you.

Coding is both a science and an art – and it takes an incredible amount of focus and dedication to be able to learn it, hone it and apply it. Of course, coding requires skills in mathematics and logic; however, on a personal level, there are additional skills that are essential. Read on for the top 4 skills all coders must have.

Confidence.

The code you write is the basis for something amazing – that, alone, should inspire confidence. But what comes first? The final result or the confidence? That’s an easy answer: the confidence! You must believe in yourself and your ability to create and program – as this is what will propel you forward toward success.

Patience.

Phenomenal websites and video games aren’t created in one day. Or two. Or three… Creating anything takes time – and patience. Don’t be too hard on yourself, and give yourself plenty of time to focus before a deadline. Once you have it down, coding may feel like a breeze – but it will always require some element of patience.

Adaptability.

Inevitably, along the way, you’ll encounter errors or challenges, and you have to be able to inhale, exhale and keep moving forward. Whether you’re working on a homework assignment or a massive project for your biggest client, the ability to adapt to situations and changes is key in any realm of technology. As technology advances and evolves, so must you.

Memory.

Having a good memory can serve you well when trying to remember where you parked the car or left your phone last, but it’s essential – not just useful – for a coder. The foundation for all actions you take when creating code lies within your ability to remember computer languages and techniques.

Confidence, patience, adaptability and memory are key components of a fantastic coder. However, not every coding expert was born with an innate ability in all 4 of these skills. You know the phrase “practice makes perfect?” It’s not only for multiplication tables and hobbies – it’s also for self-improvement and personal growth. Take time to hone these 4 soft skills – there’s no better moment to start than now.