Patience: A Coder’s Best Friend

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There was a time when if you wanted to watch a movie, you had to go to the video store and rent it; if they were all out of tapes, you didn’t get to watch it. You’d have to wait, days, sometimes weeks just to see that movie – which begs the question…

Could you survive?

Luckily, we live in an age where if we want to see a movie, we just download it or stream it off any number of streaming services. The move toward convenience and speed has reached all areas and industries, and the same progress has been demonstrated in the world of coding. Simple processes used to take copious amounts of code to carry out, but now many things are carried out through automation and can be accessed with a variety of resources online.  

Despite advancements that have simplified coding, there is one thing that hasn’t changed, you still need lots of patience.

Patience is needed when you start learning to code, and when the only languages you’ve learned up to that point are human languages, the lines of seemingly unrelated characters can take time to understand. This is no different than any other hobby or skill, like playing the guitar, you have to learn the chords before you can play a song. With coding, you must understand the importance of each character in order to build upon them to create something big like a website or a video game.

Once you start learning more advanced techniques, you’ll be required to start solving problems or going deeper into the lines of code you write. Not only will you need to pay attention to detail, but you may find yourself going over the same line multiple times before you find what you need.

Patience can help you later in life, not just while you’re learning to code. The sooner you learn patience, the better off you’ll be in the future whenever you encounter a problem or situation that takes time to resolve. When you finally get a job applying your coding knowledge, whether that be in a DevOps, Video Game Design, or Systems role, you’ll find that patience is going to be required every day on the job. That’s because you’ll also need to have patience with other members of your team, and since many coding jobs involve working in a team, those with a short fuse are not going to have an easy time.

The good news is patience is contagious, and that cool, calm demeanor you demonstrate will soon rub off on other members of your team. Who knows, that attitude may even get you a promotion, in which you’ll need even more patience for dealing with employees that you manage.

As you can see, patience will always be your best friend if you befriend it early. The start of your coding journey will be challenging at first, but you can develop habits now that will help you the rest of your life, both personally and professionally.