We have to type for just about everything now, from school reports and homework to research and job applications to the regular nine-to-five job; we have to type at least once in a while. When we do, we can either speed through the words like we’re a cyborg meant for this one specific task, or we “chicken peck” at the keyboard, hoping to type at least on sentence before the minute ends. For those that are interested in becoming a cyborg (but not really), here are a few tips on how to improve your typing speed:

Keep your eyes on the screen.

This is actually called “touch typing,” because your eyes are never (or rarely) on your fingers. This is really the easiest way to build your typing speed, because your fingers and brain memorize the placement of the keys and the most effective pattern for a quick typing speed. It’s not even about not looking, just memorization.

Use a keyboard that’s right for you.

Mechanical keyboards (that’s keyboards with the big buttons that you actually press down on, rather than the sleek, flat keyboards that you see on laptops. While these tend to have faster response times, they won’t be much of a benefit unless you are moderately proficient in touch typing.

Listen to the right music.

If you’re still trying to learn, your focus level is amplified, and if you’re listening to music with lyrics mixed with a distracting melody, then you may find yourself typing out the words that they say. Skilled typists can balance the two, since they’ve mastered their touch typing and increased their speed, but it’s an easy mistake that happens when you really get into the song.

Don’t worry about your mistakes.

Especially when your brain thinks faster than you type — and it will, most of the time — you will make mistakes. Some people find it more helpful to stop what their doing, backtrack, and re-type the word or words they messed up on. Other people see better results when they barrel forward, forgetting their mistakes until the piece of writing is finished, and they can go back and fix the mistakes one by one. It’s something to consider trying both ways, to find the best fit.

Typing doesn’t have to be a chore; practice makes perfect, so don’t worry if you feel like you can’t get it right away. Sometimes professional typists still look at their keyboard!