C++ was invented by Bjarne Stroustrup in the early 1980s as a general-purpose programming language. It is a similar language to C, which was invented by Dennis Ritchie in the early 1970s, but it is safer and includes modern programming techniques (like object-oriented programming).

The purpose of C++ is to precisely determine a sequence of operations that a computer can perform to accomplish an objective. Most of these involve manipulating text and numbers, but anything a computer can do physically can be programmed in C++.

We don’t think about this often, but computers have no intelligence – they have to be given instruction on how to perform a task. These instructions are defined by the programming language used. Once they are programmed, they can repeat the instructions very quickly as many times as the operator wishes.

Which computers have C++?

The better question is: “which computers don’t have C++?” The language is a widespread, almost universal tool and can be found on most computers, big and small alike. There are compilers for this language that are available to almost every type of operating system.

Use of C++

C++ is popular in software engineering, communications, and gaming, as well as other industries like finances, health care, and defense. The language is widely used across programming development and has been an influence on the creation of other programming languages like Java, C#, and PHP.

Learning C++

There are many places you can go to study C++. First, you’ll need a C++ compiler. There are a variety of these available, and many of them are free and include an IDE to make it easier for you to program, debug, and edit your applications.

Where does C++ stand in comparison to other programming languages?

While some code languages are written for a specific purpose, C++ is a great general-purpose language. It can work well for most programming tasks, but not for all. Other languages like Delphi, C#, and Visual Basic may work better in those situations.

Knowing how to use C++ is a foundational skill in learning how to program and code. Many jobs in a selection of fields require or prefer candidates with this skill, as there’s an immense amount of existing code that needs maintenance, updating, and (at times) rewriting. C++ also lends itself to the arts in its contributions to video game development. Needless to say, if you’re considering a job in our modern technological industry, knowing C++ will give you a leg up in your job search.