You’ve probably heard about how important coding will be in the future, how industries are implementing more technology into their operations to save money and create better products or services. Parents know the importance of learning coding, with 58% of them feeling that coding and programming is the most beneficial skill to their child’s future. When it comes to careers, few can argue that learning coding puts you in position for a great one.

But what if you just want to code for fun?

Hobbies Are Fun

Having a hobby gives us a sense of excitement and happiness when we’re pursuing them. Your grandpa had fishing, your dad had woodworking, and now you have coding. Once you get a hold of the basics you can, you can apply what you can continue to dig deeper into coding or you can just start applying it to another hobby.

That’s right, you can take your knowledge of coding and programming and apply it to activities you really love. For instance, let’s say you love writing and you have a blog that you update weekly. With coding, you can now make your blog pop even more now that you know how to manipulate the code.

You Learn Hobbies at Your Own Pace

Hobbies like playing the guitar or learning to skateboard take time to master the skills necessary. Hobbies differ from school work in that no one forces you to learn a hobby; there’s no mandatory homework or tests at the end of the year. Unless you’re taking coding classes in school, coding can be tackled on your own time. Let’s say you dive into the basics, and after a couple of weeks decide that you’re bored.

Take a break. We guarantee you that some time after you’ll want to revisit the hobby.

Many places like theCoderSchool understand that too much information at once takes the fun out of coding, so curriculum is often tailored to children based on age, skill level, and general coding goals.

It Could Come in Handy

With technology having more of an influence on our lives every day, it’s hard to imagine an industry that won’t use coding in some way or fashion. Your coding hobby could play an important role in your future and you might not even know it. Your dream could be to be a graphic designer, and when an employer has a pile of resumes to pick from, your coding hobby might make you stand out from the crowd.

While we do predict that you’ll fall in love with coding, we know that everyone has different dreams and goals. Coding may not be the most important thing in your life but having a general knowledge of it could make your dreams come true. It’s all about being well-rounded, people who are get the most attention from colleges and employers.

So can coding be a hobby?

Yes, not only can it be, but it should! After all, you want to do something you love, whether that be for work or in your free time is up to you.

Coding is growing more popular in schools, with classes offering small glimpses into the world of computer languages to teach more kids about technology. Maybe you’ve heard about coding, but still don’t know too much about what it does or takes to be good at.

If you’ve thought about learning to code but want to know more, here are three things you should take into consideration when it comes to coding.

1. It’s Not Rocket Science

Okay, learning to code could very well lead to a future working with rockets so it technically can be “rocket science.”

What we mean is that coding isn’t only meant for mega geniuses and child prodigies. In fact, anyone can learn to code! People from all walks of life have learned coding, whether it’s for their current job, a job they want in the future, or just to have a new skill under their belt. The best part is that there are tons of ways you can learn to code, whether it’s through videos online or taking classes at a coding school, you’re bound to find a way that works for you.

2. It Takes Practice

Even though coding isn’t impossible and can be learned by anyone, it doesn’t mean that it will always be easy. When you first start to learn how to code you could run into moments where you want to pull your hair out in frustration. Just remember to relax, and don’t be too hard on yourself. There are topics which you’ll have to go over time and time again just to understand, and it might be weeks before you learn how to create something you can show off to the world.

Like any skill, coding takes practice to perfect, and even when you think you’ve perfected it there’s something new just over the horizon that you’ll have to learn.

Coding is Fun

The most important thing you need to know about coding is that it’s fun to do! You may think it’s only fun for people who love computers, but coding can be applied to so many hobbies, projects, and careers.

Here are some of the things you can do once you learn how to code

  • Create fun web sites
  • Program robots and other machines
  • Develop mobile apps
  • Make video games
  • Design virtual reality systems
  • Work for hospitals and healthcare companies

These are just a few of the areas you can apply your coding knowledge to, and as technology becomes more important there will be more uses for coding in the future. This is good news for kids who can already code by the time they start deciding on their future.

There was a time when if you wanted to watch a movie, you had to go to the video store and rent it; if they were all out of tapes, you didn’t get to watch it. You’d have to wait, days, sometimes weeks just to see that movie – which begs the question…

Could you survive?

Luckily, we live in an age where if we want to see a movie, we just download it or stream it off any number of streaming services. The move toward convenience and speed has reached all areas and industries, and the same progress has been demonstrated in the world of coding. Simple processes used to take copious amounts of code to carry out, but now many things are carried out through automation and can be accessed with a variety of resources online.

Despite advancements that have simplified coding, there is one thing that hasn’t changed, you still need lots of patience.

Patience is needed when you start learning to code, and when the only languages you’ve learned up to that point are human languages, the lines of seemingly unrelated characters can take time to understand. This is no different than any other hobby or skill, like playing the guitar, you have to learn the chords before you can play a song. With coding, you must understand the importance of each character in order to build upon them to create something big like a website or a video game.

Once you start learning more advanced techniques, you’ll be required to start solving problems or going deeper into the lines of code you write. Not only will you need to pay attention to detail, but you may find yourself going over the same line multiple times before you find what you need.

Patience can help you later in life, not just while you’re learning to code. The sooner you learn patience, the better off you’ll be in the future whenever you encounter a problem or situation that takes time to resolve. When you finally get a job applying your coding knowledge, whether that be in a DevOps, Video Game Design, or Systems role, you’ll find that patience is going to be required every day on the job. That’s because you’ll also need to have patience with other members of your team, and since many coding jobs involve working in a team, those with a short fuse are not going to have an easy time.

The good news is patience is contagious, and that cool, calm demeanor you demonstrate will soon rub off on other members of your team. Who knows, that attitude may even get you a promotion, in which you’ll need even more patience for dealing with employees that you manage.

As you can see, patience will always be your best friend if you befriend it early. The start of your coding journey will be challenging at first, but you can develop habits now that will help you the rest of your life, both personally and professionally.

Learning to code has an array of incredible benefits – from teaching soft skills for everyday use to cultivating a hobby that keeps you challenged and entertained. Coding trains the brain, inspires patience and opens extensive career opportunities. Regarding the latter point, understanding how to code can also clear the path toward coveted remote job possibilities as well. Why choose a career that allows you to work remotely? Read on to find out.

 

1.       Your career doesn’t have to define your life. As much as you may love coding, a job still just becomes a job over time. Thankfully, by working from home, you can spend plenty of time pursuing hobbies and spending time with family.

 

2.       Explore side opportunities. Not sure about sticking to one job alone? Want to start your own business? Coding is a highly qualifying skill. There are abundant fields that benefit from hiring someone who understands coding. Not only can the knowledge itself lead to jobs – such as in web development – but the skills that come along with coding can also boost your resume for other opportunities in design, marketing, business operations and more.

 

3.       Save money on gas, food and other reoccurring expenses. Commuting takes a toll on your day, car and wallet. You aren’t paid for the time spent getting ready, driving and pumping gas. Working remotely allows you to make the most of each paycheck.

 

4.       Create a flexible schedule – and a flexible workplace environment. When you work remotely, you are in charge of your schedule. Yes, this means you need to have great time management skills – but, as a coder, you are probably already proficient at setting aside time to work and study. Additionally, working from home means getting to wear whatever you want – which is pretty cool, right?

 

Have you ever considered the possibility of having a full-time career while living the way you want to live – with more time, money and a flexible schedule? That’s one of the many benefits of learning how to code: You immediately qualify yourself for great work-from-home opportunities that pay well and offer you the ability to create your own lifestyle while working a job you love.